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New York Becomes 13th State to Legalize Driver’s Licenses for Undocumented Immigrants

Read the latest immigration news from Pollack, Pollack, Isaac & DeCicco, rated “Best Law Firms” by U.S. News & World Report – Best Lawyers.

New York Becomes 13th State to Legalize Driver’s Licenses for Undocumented Immigrants

On June 17, 2019, the New York State Senate passed the Driver’s License Access and Privacy Act (also known as the Green Light Bill), that grants noncommercial driver’s licenses and learner’s permits to undocumented immigrants.  The bill passed with just one more vote than the minimum required, 33 to 29, and was signed into law by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. Read More

Unless Granted Parole, Detained Immigrants Ineligible for Release on Bond

On April 16, 2019, the Attorney General issued a crucial decision that impacts detained immigrants and their ability to be released from detention on a bond. The decision that is currently in effect has altered two matters, which are as follows: Overruling of Matter of X-K-. The respondent in this matter is a citizen of Read More

New Spending Bill May Double H-2B Workers

A new piece of legislation is causing a lot of conversation and controversy in Congress. Senator John Thune (R-S.D.) introduced the “Prioritizing Help to Business Act” to help states with low unemployment during busy seasons. This bill proposes a huge change to the H-2B program, which offers permits to allow foreign nationals to temporarily work Read More

New Order to Reopen Petitions from Young Immigrants Seeking Protection Under Special Immigrant Juvenile Program

On April 9, 2019, U.S. District Judge John Koeltl of the Southern District of New York finalized his March 15 judgement order. Judge Koeltl determined that the Department of Homeland Security’s unspoken policy of denying Special Immigrant Juvenile (SIJ) status petitions for those over the age of 18 was in violation of the law.  As Read More

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Government’s Authority to Detain Immigrants

Nielsen, Secretary of Homeland Security, ET AL. v. Preap ET AL.   On March 19, 2019, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the government’s authority to detain immigrants at any time after their release from local or state custody — including individuals that have already completed prison terms — for criminal convictions potentially years ago. The Read More

DHS Implements New Way to Conduct H-1B Lottery

If you are curious about the status of the H-1B visa—a popular work visa that is valid for three years and can be renewed for another three—under President Trump’s administration, here is the latest news.  Each year, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) receives an immense number of applications for this work visa.  American Read More

H-2B Visas: New Selection Procedure After iCert Server Crash

The H-2B visa program allows United States employers to hire foreign workers for nonagricultural services on a temporary basis. The H-2B visa program is an important resource for both employers as well as foreign workers. In order to qualify for it, the petitioning employer must show that: There aren’t enough U.S. workers who are able Read More

USCIS Announces Updates to Civics Test

In order to become a citizen of the United States, foreign nationals have to go through the process of naturalization. During the standard interview, applicants are given what’s called a civics test. The civics test is an oral examination focusing on U.S. history and government. During the test, applicants are asked 10 out of a Read More

Government Shutdown and its Major Impact on Your Immigration Case

Why Did the Government Shutdown? Congress and the U.S. President cannot agree on a budget bill. The Senate passed a bill that did not include funding for the President’s border wall. President Trump insists he will not sign a budget bill unless it includes $5 billion to fund a border wall. The government shutdown is Read More

DHS Proposes Change to “Public Charge” Rule

On October 10, 2018, the Trump administration published its proposed changes to the public charge rule in order to ensure that those admitted as immigrants and temporary visa holders are more likely to be self-sufficient, and not a public charge (someone who is likely to be primarily dependent on the government for survival).  The proposed Read More

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